Vestiaire Collective to open first boutique, launches fashion campaign

Vestiaire CollectiveFrance-based luxury retail site Vestiaire Collective is to open its first boutique on October 19, for four months.

Located in the heart of Paris, the pop-up will offer Parisians and tourists the opportunity to shop a curated selection of luxury, pre-owned items. They can also have a coffee at the Vestiaire Café, and leave with a bouquet of flowers from renowned florist Racine Paris.

Vestiaire Collective is also debuting its first-ever fashion campaign, at the beginning of Paris Fashion Week. The campaign features international model of the moment Lexi Boling, Parisian ‘It’ boy Paul Hameline, and Japanese cover star Manami Kinoshita.

The campaign launched on September 28 and will run across 11 of Vestiaire Collective’s key markets, including France, US, UK, Italy, Germany, Spain, Scandinavia, Hong Kong, and Australia.

Launched in October 2009, Vestiairecollective.com has over 6 million members across 48 countries. Some 30,000 new items are submitted to the site each week.

Earlier this year, Vestiaire Collective announced a $65m investment to fuel global growth, specifically in the US and Asia Pacific, and increase operational capabilities.

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Secondhand clothing site Micolet launches in France

Screen Shot 2017-08-24 at 19.35.15FashionNetork reports that Spanish second-hand clothing site Micolet has launched in France.

Spanish brands like Lefties, Zara, Massimo Dutti, Bimba y Lola and Berskha are at the fore, but dig a little deeper and you can find an Isabel Marant Etoile top for €19.95 instead of €115, a Rag & Bone dress for €15.91 instead of €420 and a burgundy Sandro blazer (which I’ve been lusting over for ages—my friend has it in green) for €52.27 instead of €225.

For now, consumers in France can only purchase items, but are set to also be able to sell them in future (Micolet handles the process of putting items online).

Dressing Avenue: The Airbnb of luxury

Screen Shot 2017-06-23 at 12.31.40If you’ve got a special event coming up but your budget is more Primark than Prada, or you’re still feeling guilty about that fabulous dress you splurged on and wore just once, then French start-up Dressing Avenue might just have the answer.

Launched in July 2016, Dressing Avenue positions itself as the Airbnb of luxury. Thanks to the site, you can rent out what you don’t wear, and hire what you want to.

From Chanel to Chloé, the clothes, shoes and accessories made available for hire are rigorously checked by a stylist, and the authenticity of items are guaranteed by partner experts.

On average, items cost between 15 and 50 to rent per day (around 2-5% of the retail price), with a minimum rental period of 48 hours. Delivery, dry cleaning and insurance of up to 20,000 are included.

So what can you get for your money? A pair of Christian Louboutin Eugénie heels embellished with Swarovski crystals for 28 per day, a Balmain mini dress with power shoulders for 33 per day, or a Chanel Boy bag for 45 per day.

With the clothes rental market worth 600m and growing 9.8% per year, according to 2015 data from Future Market Insights cited by Dressing Avenue, this is definitely a segment to watch.

 

 

 

eBay teams up with InstantLuxe for eBay Luxe

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eBay has teamed up with InstantLuxe.com to launch eBay Luxe, an e-shop dedicated to the sale of secondhand luxury goods.

eBay Luxe will see secondhand luxury items sold on eBay via InstantLuxe (an online platform dedicated to buying and selling pre-owned pieces and owned by French department-store chain Galeries Lafayette), meaning that when you make a purchase, your item is guaranteed to be authentic.

From bags to bracelets, brands on offer include Cartier, Céline and Chanel.

Dress in the City

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Another day, another sustainable fashion concept. Dress in the City stands out for the way it combines the sale of preloved items online and in brick-and-mortar stores.

Launched by Florence Faure, Dress in the City allows people to buy (and sell) via its app and e-boutique, as well as at pop-up stores in shopping centres in Ile-de-France.

Dress in the City will be at the Parly 2 shopping centre from March 22 – April 1, 2017, at So Ouest from 19-29 April and at Vélizy 2 from 20-30 April. In store, the peculiarity lies in the method of purchase. You register your bank details via the app (as you would for Uber, for example), then scan a QR code and validate the purchase, which unlocks the item’s security tag.

A quick look at its website reveals a host of mid- and high-end secondhand items on sale (at around 70% off the rrp on average, according to Faure), including an Yves Saint Laurent Muse bag for 850, a pair of Repetto ballet shoes for 69, a Carven jumper for 59 and a Zara black peplum top with necklace detail for 22.

eBay to launch authentification program for secondhand luxury goods

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Although I’m yet to buy a secondhand designer bag online, my default go-to website for a quick browse is always Vestiaire Collective. Why? Because when you buy an item via the site, it is automatically inspected by Vestiaire Collective’s team, who are said to be highly trained in spotting counterfeits. So you can be sure that what you are forking out a lot of money for is indeed the genuine article.

Probably the last place I would look is eBay, because we so often hear stories of people buying goods that turn out to be fake—Christina Warren of Gizmodo wrote about how she bought a Louis Vuitton bag on eBay for $300, only for the zipper to break. When she took it to a Louis Vuitton store to be replaced, the sales assistant told her it was fake. And we’ve all heard a tale about someone buying something based on a stock photo, only for a cheap knock off to arrive in the post.

Counterfeit goods on online marketplaces such as eBay erode consumer confidence and can have a detrimental effect on the many sellers out there who sell genuine designer goods.

Although eBay already has anti-counterfeit initiatives such as the Verified Rights Owner (VeRO) program, which allows rights holders to quickly report items listed on eBay that are possible counterfeits, the auction site announced last week that it is going one step further and launching the eBay authentificate program later this year.

How it works is simple: sellers or buyers opt into the service for a fee on specific types of products on eBay (the program will initially be focusing on high-end fashion, such as designer handbags), and the item is then reviewed by a professional authentificator before being shipped to the buyer once it passes the inspection. And if the item is shipped but is later found to be counterfeit, eBay says it will refund the buyer two times the cost of the original purchase price.

The program looks to be win-win for both buyers and sellers: buyers can confidently purchase big-ticket items, and sellers can get the best price for what they are selling. Provided, of course, that people are willing to pay for this authentification. And there’s the rub—eBay hasn’t yet revealed details of how much the service costs, but I’m guessing it won’t come cheap.

Oxfam online boutique 70% off sale

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Oxfam UK is currently running a sale on its online boutique, with up to 70% off preloved clothing and accessories. There are many great bargains to be had, too. If I had size 5 feet I’d be snapping up the black Burberry courts (pictured) that are now just £28.50, down from £95. I also love the purple strapless Karen Millen dress, which is now a mere £4.79, down from £15.99. I posted a picture of this dress on Instagram – it looks stunning. There’s also a black Gucci dress for £52.50, down from £175, and a Hobbs black and white dress for £15 instead of £50.

The item I’m most drawn to, however, isn’t actually in the sale. It’s a Paul Smith Black Label fuchsia skirt for £39.99 (I also posted this on Instagram). I can’t work out what size it is though – it’s a size 42 on the label, listed on Oxfam’s site as a size 14 with a 27.5 inch waist. If a 27.5 inch waist is a size 14, then I must be bordering on morbidly obese….