Marupe pop-up store in Boulogne

img_2699App-based consignment store Marupe is hosting a pop-up in the Parisian suburb of Boulogne-Billancourt from 22 May until 10 June.

So if you’ve browsed the app, liked what you saw but are yet to take the plunge, the pop-up store is the perfect opportunity to try before you buy. You’ll be able to get gems such as a pair of Jonak loafers for €80, an American Retro jacket for €95 and a Claudie Pierlot t-shirt for €35.

On at 49 rue Gambetta, 92100 Boulogne-Billancourt

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Bis boutique special designer and vintage sale

Parisian secondhand store Bis Boutique is hosting a special sale of vintage and designer items at its rue Lamartine shop on Saturday 19 May.

There will be 500 pieces to rifle through, including Manolo Blahnik shoes for €45, a Kenzo catwalk dress for €20 and an Etro dress for €16.

As you can see, everything’s as cheap as chips, so expect a big crowd in the early morning.

At 19 rue Lamartine, 75009, from 10am.

Le Cozy Corner to host second homeware sale

Screen Shot 2018-05-17 at 12.13.32French start-up Le Cozy Corner is hosting its second flash sale on May 26.

Like the first event back in January, items on sale will come from Maison Options, a specialist in furniture and decorations hire for events. You can snap up a chandelier for the bargain price of €10, a wooden music stand for €15, and, weirdly (or not), a saddle for €40. Le Cozy Corner is also partnering with UpCycly, which makes furniture from recycled wooden palettes.

On at Ground Control, 81 rue du Charolais, 75012, 11am to 8pm.

Violette Sauvage vide dressing at La Cour du Marais

This weekend is the Violette Sauvage vide dressing at La Cour du Marais on Paris’ rue des Archives.

You’re always guaranteed to find some great stuff at these events, and today was no exception: I spotted a red Sandro dress for €60, a Gucci-esque embroidered Zara skirt for €10, and a gorgeous Sezane grey and black polka dot mini skirt for €35. Emphasis on the mini, sadly, as even for a Brit it was just too short.

So what did I buy? If I had size 5 feet I would have bought the Sezane leopard print trainers and the Claudie Pierlot x Veja pair, but I don’t, so instead picked up two pairs of brand-new-with-tags Noisy May jeans for €20 each. This Danish brand offers good quality denim at great prices, so if you live in jeans, you’ll want to check it out. I’m always on the hunt for jeans that don’t go baggy on the knee – from J brand to Acne, Levis, zara and H&M, I’ve tried them all and always wound up disappointed, so fingers crossed that this Scandi brand will live up to expectations.

Violette Sauvage vide dressing – Saturday 27 and Sunday 28 April, La Cour du Marais, 81 rue des Archives, 75003.

Vestiaire Collective at Vogue Experience Paris

French online luxury resale store Vestiaire Collective hosted three masterclasses at the inaugural Vogue Experience day in Paris last Saturday. Each masterclass tackled a different subject: wardrobe detoxes, 90s and vintage fashion and how to authenticate a Birkin.

Wardrobe detox

Taking tips from Vestiaire Collective co-founder Fanny Moison, the site’s editor-in-chief Elvira Masson talked attendees through the best way to approach a wardrobe detox.

Women wear about 40% of their wardrobe, Masson said, which means that more than half of our clothes are not being worn. So instead of leaving them to languish, why not put them back into circulation and give them a second life? Try the coat hanger trick-at the beginning of each season, put all your clothes hangers facing the same way, and each time you wear something turn the hanger round. At the end of the season, let go of everything you don’t wear.

A great tip to keep the size of your wardrobe under control is the ‘one in one out’ policy: every time you buy something, you must sell (or donate) something you already own.

So what gems might you have in your wardrobe that you could resell on Vestiaire Collective? Some 75-80% of the site’s sales are done with handbags-the likes of Chanel, Hermès, Vuitton and Gucci.

The site, which is present in 50 countries (and has more than 6 million members), sees different demand depending on the market. Italy, for example, is more a nation of sellers than buyers, and the American market goes mad for Goyard totes. While you need to think seasonally when selling successfully on Vestiaire Collective, Masson said, remember that summer in Europe means winter in Australia, and that you can very well sell swimwear in France in winter as many jet off for a sun holiday around this time. In terms of trends, it’s all about the colour red and bucket bags this season, she said.

How to authenticate an Hermès Birkin

Authentication is a priority at Vestiaire Collective, and the luxury resale site has signed a charter in France against counterfeiting alongside luxury brands.

In the second masterclass of the day, Vestiaire Collective head of authentication Victoire Boyer Chammard talked about the process of authenticating luxury handbags.

With digital-savvy, designer label enthusiasts flocking to Instagram to show off their latest purchases, the platform has become a source of inspiration for counterfeiters, she highlighted.

Hence the importance of ensuring that its customers are getting the genuine article. Vestiaire Collective first tries to verify authenticity using the photos submitted by the seller, and then via quality control of the item once it’s sold.

Each brand has its own codes, Boyer Chammard said, pointing out the peculiarity of Chanel typography and the particular smell of Hermès leather. Vestiaire Collective’s rigorous authentication process includes looking at the model, the quality of the material, the construction, the finish and the hardware, as well as the the receipt, dustbag and the packaging.

A great touch at the end of the masterclass was the selection of bags passed around for the audience to authenticate.

90s/Vintage fashion

What is vintage? Either this question from masterclass leader Marie Blanchet, head of the vintage category at Vestiaire Collective, had the audience stumped, or people were too shy to answer.

The term vintage began to be used in the 80s, she explained, to designate pieces that are already part of history, that are unique, rare and quality items, which are the antithesis of fast fashion.

Vestiaire Collective is dusting off vintage and making it cool. The site has almost 50,000 pieces, from the 60s to the mid 90s-it even loaned some pieces to the Margiela exhibition currently in Paris. And speaking of Margiela, Blanchet said that the famously discreet Belgian designer pretty much did everything that has inspired fashion today. Think the legging shoes that never made it into production from Margiela’s catwalk in 2004-since Balenciaga launched a version last year, these can now be seen everywhere, including at Zara.

As we know, said Blanchet, the 90s are having a moment. Marc Jacobs’ last show was an hommage to the decade, and it’s all about logomania right now.

Blanchet also pointed out the return of the Fendi baguette and the Dior Saddle bag-18 months ago there was no demand for the latter, but now it’s a big success. And the Yves Saint Laurent tasseled clutch bag originally created as a gift with purchase for the Opium fragrance has had its own moment since the bag was reissued.

Ready, steady shop

Make sure you put April 17 in your diary-this is when Vestiaire Collective is launching a vintage digital pop-up in collaboration with Byronesque, the editorial-led e-commerce company dedicated to designer vintage fashion. Some 200 pieces will be on sale, including a Jean-Paul Gaultier belted trench and a Helmut Lang Bowie tank.

Secondhand bargains

It’s been a while since I shared some of my bargains, so here’s a look at some of my recent finds: mohair and wool blanket (for the fabulous Parisian apartment I’ll probably never be able to afford), Guess Starlight Skinny jeans (the first time I’ve bought Guess jeans and I love them) and Moroccanoil hair oil (because this has rave reviews so must be worth the hype). All found at vide greniers, Paris’ version of carboot sales.

Ding Fring fashion show

Parisian secondhand shop Ding Fring played host to a stylish secondhand fashion show last Thursday. Models sporting bright colors and bold prints were sent down the ‘catwalk’, and the ‘see now, buy it now’ philosophy meant you could purchase the up-cycled outfits straight after the show.

The event was organized by Le Relais Val de Seine (which sorts, recycles and resells donated clothing, runs the Ding Fring shops and is part of solidarity movement Emmaus France) in partnership with designer Anaïs DW.

The fashion show was followed by champagne and snacks, and of course some shopping.

I bought an H&M dress for €9 and a top from L’Edito Paris (the private label line of department store Printemps), which is rather Gucci-inspired and was pricier at €18, but it’s all for a good cause, right? Also spotted was a suede fringed IKKS jacket, a pair of black patent Chie Mihara heels and a brand new with tags Paul & Joe shirt.

Ding Fring, 340 rue des Pyrenées, 75020